Tag Archives: SAMMC

Eating in Season: Check out Texas’ Local Flavor

By 2nd Lt. Miriam Craft
Dietetic Intern, Department of Nutritional Medicine 

Farmers markets are a great source for fresh produce and preparation tips. Courtesy photo

Spring has sprung! And here in the heart of Texas there’s no better time to begin eating what’s in season. Eating seasonally usually goes hand-in-hand with eating food that is grown locally. This not only benefits nearby farmers, but can also benefit you by saving you money at the register.

Produce that’s picked closer to peak ripeness provides more nutrient-rich flavor to you and your family for every dollar you spend, and purchasing what’s in season will ensure you are serving up the best tasting fruits and vegetables available. Have you ever tried dewberries, rainbow chard, or blood oranges? When at their seasonal best, these and other curious crops may cause even the pickiest of eaters to appreciate their novelty.

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Top 10 Reasons I Admire Military Kids

By Elaine Sanchez
April 1, 2013

In honor of April’s Month of the Military Child, I created a Top 10 list of the qualities I most appreciate about children from military families. Their amazing service and sacrifice deserve a much longer list, but I figured this would at least be a start.

The top 10 reasons I admire military children:

10. Their sense of humor. Military kids do all they can to keep their spirits up. Some carry life-sized cardboard posters of parents called “Flat Daddies” and “Flat Mommies” to keep deployed loved ones close at hand. They carry them to pizza parties and movies, sporting events and concerts. During a past deployment, military wife Vivian Greentree’s sons took it a step further. They pasted pictures of their deployed dad on a stick, dubbed it a “dad on a stick” and took it everywhere with them. They even asked their “dad” to help them make macaroni and cheese.

9. They selflessly serve their community. Military children possess a strong sense of service — perhaps modeled after their military parents who serve and sacrifice daily. A shining example is last year’s Army Military Child of the Year, Amelia McConnell. Soon after her father returned from Iraq in 2006, he was diagnosed with leukemia. After treatment, he redeployed to Iraq in 2007. In 2009, her only brother, Sgt. Andrew McConnell, was killed in Afghanistan. Still, Amelia excelled in school and in sports, and volunteered hundreds of hours a year for a number of organizations. When asked why she does so much, she said, “I always think there are a lot of people in worse situations than I am.”

8. They stand by their military parent through thick and thin. I met a high school senior several years ago who told me his father would miss his graduation and his departure to college. But this teen wasn’t upset in the least. “He loves to be a soldier, and if it makes him happy, it makes me happy,” he said. “How can I possibly complain that he’s not watching me graduate when he’s out there sacrificing for our nation.”

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BAMC Dietitians Can Guide You to Better Health

By Lt. Col. Marybeth Salgueiro
Registered Dietitian, BAMC Department of Nutritional Medicine

Ads_NNM13_v1Did you know Brooke Army Medical Center has dietary experts on hand who can help you make positive lifestyle changes for good health?

Here at BAMC, we have a staff of 18 military and civilian registered dietitians assigned to the Department of Nutritional Medicine. All are food and nutrition experts who translate the science of nutrition into practical solutions for healthy living. 

RDs work in hospitals, schools, clinics, food service management, education and research.  Most of our staff has advanced degrees and many hold special certifications in areas such as nutrition support, diabetes education, pediatrics, weight management and sports nutrition. 

Whether you are interested in losing weight, improving physical performance, or have a special dietary need, we are standing by ready to help you make positive lifestyle changes for good health. 

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Stay positive: Don’t feed the monster!

By Beverly Benson
BAMC RN/Health Promotion Educator
Army Public Health Nursing

Last time I told you to watch out for “Shoulder Guy” who keeps you from doing the things you know you should, like eating healthy or exercising (read blog here). He is also very good at being negative. I refer to the really negative “shoulder guy” as “the Monster.”

The Monster will hand you a sweater of guilt, remind you of something hurtful someone said in your past, tell you that you have no worth or value, that you should quit, or not even try. Shoulder guy’s job is to keep you down emotionally, physically and mentally. He is very good at his job!

Remember: Fred Astaire was told he couldn’t act or sing and he could only dance “a little.” Lucille Ball was told she was only “mediocre” and shouldn’t pursue acting. The Beatles were told “No” by their first record company and that their sound was “way out.”  Walt Disney was told he “lacked imagination and had no original ideas.” Really?!

Continue reading Stay positive: Don’t feed the monster!

National Nutrition Month: What’s on Your Plate?

By Lt. Col. Marybeth Salgueiro
Registered Dietitian, BAMC Department of Nutritional Medicine

March is National Nutrition Month, and what better time to kick off our Nutritional Medicine blog series? The National Nutrition Month 2013 theme, “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day,” encourages personalized healthy eating styles and recognizes that food preferences, lifestyle, traditions and health concerns all impact our individual food choices. Our registered dietitians and dietetic interns will be blogging periodically to share our tips for using nutrition to improve (or maintain) your health. 

Be on the lookout for our staff promoting National Nutrition Month and healthy eating throughout BAMC in March. You might have seen the “peas” at the Garden Entrance last week or out at the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band Concert, where I hear the “carrot” made an appearance too.

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Stars Show Appreciation for BAMC Staff, Patients

By Elaine Sanchez
BAMC Public Affairs
BAMC Beat blog

 

Celebrity chef Robert Irvine passes on a few grilling tips to 14-year-old Sarah Neal, a BAMC pediatric oncology patient, during the appreciation day at San Antonio Military Medical Center, March 6, 2013. U.S. Army photo by Jen Rodriguez
Celebrity chef Robert Irvine passes on a few grilling tips to 14-year-old Sarah Neal, a BAMC pediatric oncology patient, during the appreciation day at San Antonio Military Medical Center, March 6, 2013. U.S. Army photo by Jen Rodriguez

Yesterday, a few Hollywood stars showed their appreciation for our nation’s warriors, their Families and those who care for them with a huge celebration in the front of San Antonio Military Medical Center.

Nearly 6,000 Brooke Army Medical Center staff, patients and Families came out for the concert featuring Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band and a barbecue prepared by celebrity chef Robert Irvine.

The lines snaked around the food tables and out to the kids’ bouncy houses, but moved along quickly as people piled their plates high with hamburgers, hot dogs and barbecue chicken.

Chef Irvine, sporting a maroon BAMC T-shirt, took time out from posing for photos to share a few grilling tips with fans of his show, “Restaurant: Impossible.”

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BAMC’s First ECMO Baby Celebrates 1st Birthday

By Elaine Sanchez
BAMC Public Affairs
BAMC Beat blog

 The first patient treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at San Antonio Military Medical Center recently celebrated a first of her own – her birthday.

 

Brianna Sackreiter, the first patient treated with ECMO at San Antonio Military Medical Center  turned 1-year-old last month. Courtesy photo
Brianna Sackreiter, the first patient treated with ECMO at San Antonio Military Medical Center, turned 1-year-old last month. Courtesy photo

Brianna Sackreiter, whose father is an active duty Soldier, was born in Honduras on Jan. 13, 2012, with a major abdominal wall defect. She underwent surgical repairs, but developed intestinal complications and a severe bloodstream infection. She had further complications during a transfer from Honduras to Seattle Children’s Hospital that caused the flight to divert to SAMMC.

Due to the severity of her illness, doctors determined ECMO would be the only lifesaving course. ECMO is a heart-lung bypass system that replaces the natural functions of the heart and lungs, allowing an infant or child to rest while treatments and natural healing of the affected organs take place.

“It was decided that she would surely die without ECMO,” Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Michael Shoemaker, a SAMMC neonatologist, said at the time.

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Sleepless in SAMMC?

 By Dr. Laura Avila
Clinical Health Psychologist, Pulmonary Clinic

 

National Sleep Awareness Week is March 3-10. March 3-10 is the National Sleep Foundation’s annual week-long campaign to celebrate the health benefits of sleep.
March 3-10 is the National Sleep Foundation’s annual week-long campaign to celebrate the health benefits of sleep.

Insomnia is one of the most frequent problems I encounter among patients (and staff!).  Whether it is the inability to fall asleep, stay asleep, or wake up ready to go, insomnia is very frustrating.  However, insomnia is also very treatable.

 

Sleep is a very natural, automatic process.  The brain left to itself, without any interference, would likely maintain a very balanced and protective sleep-wake cycle.

The following tips have been found by sleep experts to be effective in managing insomnia:

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Focus on Warriors’ Ability

By Elaine Sanchez
BAMC Public Affairs
BAMC Beat blog
 

Marine Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos operates a smart phone.  Courtesy photo
With the help of his prosthetic arm, Marine Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos operates his smart phone. Gallegos lost his arm in an IED explosion in Afghanistan in 2010. Courtesy photo

Marine Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos was browsing a store in South Texas when he overheard a passerby talking about his robotic arm.

The man approached the Marine and asked him a question that Gallegos still cringes about today: “Is that a Halloween costume?”

The typically laid-back Marine immediately “took him to task,” explaining he had lost his right arm in an explosion in Afghanistan.

Due to insensitive comments like this one, the Marine now wears a jacket outside, despite the sweltering Texas heat. “I just want to avoid the stares,” said Gallegos, who is undergoing rehabilitation at the Center for the Intrepid.

 

Marine Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos started kayaking during his recovery and is now considering trying out for the national Paralympic team. Gallegos lost his arm in an IED explosion in Afghanistan in 2010. Courtesy photo
Marine Cpl. Sebastian Gallegos started kayaking during his recovery and is now considering trying out for the national Paralympic team. Gallegos lost his arm in an IED explosion in Afghanistan in 2010. Courtesy photo

At Brooke Army Medical Center, we’re accustomed to the sight of Wounded Warriors with prosthetic limbs or visible scars. Rather than stares or whispers, their presence evokes a deep sense of pride and gratitude.

However, as Gallegos has discovered, this sentiment isn’t always echoed elsewhere. When he’s out in short sleeves, people either stare or shower him with a torrent of personal questions that he’d rather not broach.

“It’s embarrassing,” he said. “And, to me as a Marine, it shows a lack of respect.”

These people typically see just a disability, he said, rather than a symbol of courage and sacrifice.

Continue reading Focus on Warriors’ Ability

BAMC Staff Members Show Appreciation for Patients

In honor of Patient Recognition Month, we asked Brooke Army Medical Center staff, “What do you most appreciate about BAMC patients?” The following are just a few of the responses. Please don’t hesitate to add your thoughts in the comment section below. 

Barbara Prado
Medical Support Technician

“That no matter what they’re going through — their families, their dads and husbands are away — they still have a smile; they’re very courteous. That makes our job easier when they’re so polite, so understanding and caring, and so we try to give that back to them.” For video clip, click here.

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Edward McDaniel
Internal Medicine Physician

“I love taking care of the patients here at Brooke Army Medical Center. They’re such a wonderful group – retirees, their family members, active duty personnel. They really want to take care of themselves and get better; [they’re] really committed to their health.” For video clip, click here.

Air Force Maj. Bryan Williams
Staff Maxillofacial Prosthodontist

“What I most appreciate about our patients here is not only that they do serve or have served our country, but they’re also very appreciative of the treatment that we do and the treatment we provide for them. And they’re very appreciative of the doctors and staff.” For video clip, click here.

Kyle Johannsen
Kinesiotherapist,Cardiac Rehabilitation

“What I most appreciate is the opportunity to give back. Being a veteran myself, growing up in a military background, the chance to give back to the sacrifice of veterans here and seeing their willingness to get better on their own. The chance to do that for them … that’s what I really like about it.” For video clip, click here.

Shatanya Gilliam
4W

“The things they go through in war. When they come back they have to come through the transition of knowing a difference. And that difference is, they have to get better. I thank them for that.” For video clip, click here.